The Ranch Review

Courtesy+of+S.+Sharkey+
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The Ranch Review

Courtesy of S. Sharkey

Courtesy of S. Sharkey

Courtesy of S. Sharkey

Courtesy of S. Sharkey

Skylar Sharkey

The Netflix production “The Ranch” is a story created by Jim Patterson and Don Reo, the co-creators of “Two and a Half Men.” The show consists of corny tired jokes and flat characters. It’s pretty easy to overlook this production and trust me, you aren’t missing anything.

This show follows Colt Bennett, played by acting sensation Ashton Kutcher, a down-on-his-luck football player riding out the end of his career. He returns to Garrison, Colorado where his emotionally-constipated father Beau Bennett, played by Sam Elliott, and immature older brother Rooster, played by Danny Masterson, tend to the family ranch. 

Throughout the first season, our underdog Colt struggles with his attraction to both his former girlfriend, all-American Abby, and the 20-something blonde that he fools around with on the side. Beau, his father, attempts to maintain a relationship with his wife while only communicating in rough grunts and scathing insults, and Rooster is just along for the ride, as well as a couple of cheap beers.

I was alarmed to find that within the first couple of episodes I had heard multiple four letter curses as well as saw an eyeful of Ashton Kutcher’s rear. If I ever see that particular body part again, it will be too soon.

Don’t get me wrong, there were moments throughout the show that I found myself laughing out loud. Some jokes are well thought out, but those were far and few between. They were overshadowed by the severe lack of diversity in the cast, the immaturity, the crass nature of the characters, and the practically predictable plot.

Often I found myself staring off into space, only to find that I’d missed 10 minutes worth of pointless banter.The show’s frankly unnecessary explicit humor draws away from the plot line and the character development.

If you’re an 80-year-old, senile man you’ll love the mostly white cast, double-entendres, and flaccid plot line that this show provides.

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