Twenty One Pilots has high potential with “Blurryface”

21 Pilots posing for their newest album release Blurryface (Courtesy of www.facebook.com/twentyonepilots).

21 Pilots posing for their newest album release “Blurryface” (Courtesy of www.facebook.com/twentyonepilots).

By Kat Gorospe

Maybe it is the unique alternative sound that got Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun their share of fame; or maybe it is the advantage of social media that got the word out.

Whatever the case may be, the Ohio duo, Twenty One Pilots, is overhyped.

I never paid much attention to new bands since I figured they would come and go just like every other artist has. However, it seemed that the talk of Twenty One Pilots was on the rise, rather than staying low-key (which their “original” fans would probably prefer).

T-shirts with their famous red, white, and blue logo started popping up everywhere I turned, and I thought it was about time I gave their music a chance.

Plugging in my headphones to my laptop, I was excited as I pulled up their new album “Blurryface” on iTunes.

21 Pilots posing for their newest album release "Blurryface" (Courtesy of www.facebook.com/twentyonepilots).
Twenty One Pilots posing for their newest album release “Blurryface” (Courtesy of www.facebook.com/twentyonepilots).

And after going through the first few tracks, I knew this album was going to be below par than what I had hoped for.

I was expecting something that would blow me away since fans on Twitter were saying that the album “brought them to tears” and “gave them chills”, but what was blasting through my speakers was nothing different than what I have heard before.

The popular tracks “Lane Boy” and “Stressed Out” can easily be compared to artist Hoodie Allen because of the rap/alternative lyrics, and frankly, Hoodie Allen does it better.

The band’s sound could be described as a mellow version of All Time Low, and that can be heard through songs such as “Heavydirtysoul” and “Tear In My Heart”.

Considering there are only about four good songs on the album when there are 14, “Blurrylines” needs work. With all the hype and hipster image the band has, you would think the music would at least live up to the name.

However, given that that this only their third album, Twenty One Pilots can only go up from here.