‘The Girl on the Train’ never quite leaves the station

%22The+Girl+on+the+Train%22+opened+in+theaters+on+October+7%2C+2016.+%28courtesy+of+Facebook%29
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‘The Girl on the Train’ never quite leaves the station

"The Girl on the Train" opened in theaters on October 7, 2016. (courtesy of Facebook)

"The Girl on the Train" opened in theaters on October 7, 2016. (courtesy of Facebook)

"The Girl on the Train" opened in theaters on October 7, 2016. (courtesy of Facebook)

Madeline Moffett

It’s almost impossible for a movie adaptation to live up to the expectations set by the book. “Harry Potter” came dangerously close, but that’s about as far as it goes. “The Girl on the Train” unfortunately, like so many other adaptations, fell disappointingly short.

This story follows the traumatic weeks after alcoholic Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt)’s tumultuous divorce. Her ex-husband, Tom (Justin Theroux), cheated on her with Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), and had a baby girl shortly after. Seeing Tom with his new family only sends Rachel into a deeper spiral.

Rachel’s drinking extends past her failed relationship; she loses her job and neglects to tell even her roommate about yet another loss. In order to keep living her lie, Rachel continues to take the same train route she took every day to her old job. And every day, she would look out the window and see the perfect couple.

But one day, she looks up at the house and does not see the woman. And the next day, the woman is absent from the balcony. Rachel discovers that Megan Hipwell (Haley Bennett), the woman she would stare at enviously every morning, has gone missing. She launches herself into the ensuing investigation, tangling her into a web of lies, deceit, and pretty lousy acting.

Don’t get me wrong, Blunt was fantastic as always. Her drunken blackouts and hysterical breakdowns were entertaining and worthy of some praise.

Her costars were not so captivating. Ferguson and Bennett had the opportunity to break out onto the Hollywood scene and, much to my dismay, fell boringly flat. The script had major holes in the plot line and veered too far away from the book (moving the setting from dreary London to upbeat New York changed the mood of the story drastically).

The book itself by Paula Hawkins is just a cheap rip on Gillian Flynn’s blockbuster, “Gone Girl.” Both feature a broken marriage between two mentally unstable people, a crazy wife going missing, and an unexpected ending. So basically, if you have seen Rosamund Pike and Ben Affleck duke it out on the big screen, you’ve seen this one too.

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